Candida Diet Fish Recipes

Below are a bunch of candida diet fish recipes that have little if any bad candida diet foods in them You may notice a tablespoon or two of things that should be avoided but in these amounts it will not hurt you. Most of them are things like cornstarch or a little flour that are added to give a little consistency to the sauces. If there are any sugars you can easily substitute with xylitol, which is also antifungal.

I do suggest you avoid shark, tuna, swordfish, shellfish, and farm raised salmon because of high mercury levels. The safest fish are shrimp and sardines and wild fish is always better than farm raised. Always trim the belly and dorsel fin section of any fish. These two areas contain the most fat and that is where most toxins accumulate.

Mercury free wild salmon can be bought here almost year round. They also have organic oils, berries, nuts, and seasonings to delite your palate. The candida diet doesn't have to be bland and boring folks.

Boiled Candida Diet Fish Recipes

Boiling extracts flavor and, to some extent, nutriment from the food to which this cookery method is applied. Therefore, unless the fish to be cooked is one that has a very strong flavor and that will be improved by the loss of flavor, it should not be boiled. Much care should be exercised in boiling fish, because the meat is usually so tender that it is likely to boil to pieces or to fall apart.

When a fish is to be boiled, clean it and, if desired, remove the head. Pour sufficient boiling water to cover the fish well into the vessel in which it is to be cooked, and add salt in the proportion of 1 teaspoonful to each quart of water. Tie the fish in a strip of cheesecloth or gauze if necessary, and lower it into the vessel of slowly boiling water. Allow the fish to boil until it may be easily pierced with a fork; then take it out of the water and remove the cloth, provided one is used. Serve with a well-seasoned sauce, such as lemon cream, horseradish, lemon juice and olive oil dressing etc.


BOILED SALMON -1

This fish is seldom sent to the table whole, being too large for any ordinary sized family; the middle cut is considered the choicest to boil. Care should be taken when carving not to break the flakes of the fish, as that impairs its appearance. The flesh of the salmon is rich and delicious in flavor. Salmon is in season from the first of February to the end of August.


BOILED SALMON -2

The middle slice of salmon is the best. Sew up neatly in a mosquito-net bag, and boil a quarter of an hour to the pound in hot salted water. When done, unwrap with care, and lay upon a hot dish, taking care not to break it. Have ready a large cupful of drawn butter, very rich, in which has been stirred a tablespoonful of minced parsley and the juice of a lemon. Pour half upon the salmon and serve the rest in a boat. Garnish with parsley and sliced eggs.


BOILED SALMON -3

When smoked salmon can be secured, it makes a splendid fish for boiling. If it is cooked until tender and then served with a well-seasoned sauce, it will find favor with most persons. Freshen smoked salmon in warm water as much as seems necessary, remembering that the cooking to which it will be subjected will remove a large amount of the superfluous salt. Cover the salmon with hot water, and simmer slowly until it becomes tender. Remove from the water, pour a little melted butter over it, and serve with any desired sauce.


BOILED SALT SALMON

Let salmon soak over night, and boil it slowly for two hours; eat it with drawn butter.


BOILED COD

A fish that lends itself well to boiling and the candida diet is fresh cod. In fact, codfish prepared according to this method and served with a sauce makes a very appetizing dish.

Scale, clean, and skin a fresh cod and wrap it in a single layer of gauze or cheesecloth. Place it in a kettle or a pan of freshly boiling water to which has been added 1 teaspoonful of salt to each quart of water. Boil until the fish may be easily pierced with a fork, take from the water, and remove the gauze or cheesecloth carefully so as to keep the fish intact. Serve with sauce and slices of lemon.


BOILED SALT COD

Put your fish to soak over night; change the water in the morning, and let it stay till you put it on, which should be two hours before dinner; keep it at scalding heat all the time, but do not let it boil, or it will get hard; eat it with egg sauce or drawn butter.


BOILED COD WITH LOBSTER SAUCE

Boil the fish, as directed [see boiled fish], and, when done, carefully remove the skin from one side; then turn the fish over on to the dish on which it is to be served, skin side up. Remove the skin from this side. Wipe the dish with a damp cloth. Pour a few spoonfuls of the sauce over the fish, and the remainder around it; garnish with parsley, and serve. This is a handsome dish.


BOILED HADDOCK WITH LOBSTER SAUCE

The same as cod. In fact, all kinds of fish can be served in the same manner; but the lighter are the better, as the sauce is so rich that it is not really the thing for salmon and blue fish. Many of the best cooks and caterers, however, use the lobster sauce with salmon, but salmon has too rich and delicate a flavor to be mixed with the lobster.

I hope you have found these bolied fish recipes for the candida diet helpful.

Broiled Candida Fish Diet Recipes

The best way in which to cook small fish, thin strips of fish, or even good-sized fish that are comparatively thin when they are split open is to broil them. Since in this method of cooking the flavor is entirely retained, it is especially desirable for any fish of delicate flavor.

To broil fish, sear them quickly over a very hot fire and then cook them more slowly until they are done, turning frequently to prevent burning. As most fish, and particularly the small ones used for broiling, contain almost no fat, it is necessary to supply fat for successful broiling and improvement of flavor. It is difficult to add fat to the fish while it is broiling, so, as a rule, the fat is spread over the surface of the fish after it has been removed from the broiler. The fat may consist of broiled strips of bacon or salt pork, or it may be merely melted butter or other fat.


BROILED FISH -2

Bluefish, young cod, salmon, large trout, and all other fish, when they weigh between half a pound and four pounds, are nice for broiling. When smaller or larger they are not so good. Always use a double broiler, which, before putting the fish into it, rub with butter. This prevents sticking. The thickness of the fish will have to be the guide in broiling. A bluefish weighing four pounds will take from twenty minutes to half an hour to cook. Many cooks brown the fish handsomely over the coals and then put it into the oven to finish broiling. Where the fish is very thick, this is a good plan. If the fish is taken from the broiler to be put into the oven, it should be slipped on to a tin sheet, that it may slide easily into the platter at serving time; for nothing so mars a dish of fish as to have it come to the table broken.

In broiling, the inside should be exposed to the fire first, and then the skin. Great care must be taken that the skin does not burn. Mackerel will broil in from twelve to twenty minutes, young cod (also called scrod) in from twenty to thirty minutes, bluefish in from twenty to thirty minutes, salmon, in from twelve to twenty minutes, and whitefish, bass, mullet, etc., in about eighteen minutes. All kinds of broiled fish can be served with a seasoning of salt, pepper and butter, or with any fish sauces. Always, when possible, garnish with parsley or something else green.

BROILED FRESH MACKEREL

Probably no fish lends itself better to broiling than fresh mackerel, as the flesh of this fish is tender and contains sufficient fat to have a good flavor. To improve the flavor, however, strips of bacon are usually placed over the fish and allowed to broil with it.

Clean and skin a fresh mackerel. Place the fish thus prepared in a broiler, and broil first on one side and then on the other. When seared all over, place strips of bacon over the fish and continue to broil until it is done. Remove from the broiler, season with salt and pepper, and serve.


BROILED SHAD ROE

The mass of eggs found in shad is known as the 'roe of shad'. Roe may be purchased separately, when it is found in the markets, or it may be procured from the fish itself. It makes a delicious dish when broiled, especially when it is rolled in fat and bread crumbs - go easy.

Wash the roe that is to be used and dry it carefully between towels. Roll it in bacon fat or melted butter and then in fine crumbs. Place in a broiler, broil until completely done on one side, turn and then broil until entirely cooked on the other side. Remove from the broiler and
pour melted butter over each piece. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and serve hot.


BROILED SALMON

Cut the slices one inch thick, and season them with pepper and salt; butter a sheet of white paper, lay each slice on a separate piece, envelop them in it with their ends twisted; broil gently over a clear fire, and serve with anchovy or caper sauce. When higher seasoning is required, add a few chopped herbs and a little spice.


BROILED SALT SALMON

Soak salmon in tepid or cold water twenty-four hours, changing water several times, or let stand under faucet of running water. If in a hurry, or desiring a very salt relish, it may do to soak a short time, having water warm, and changing, parboiling slightly. At the hour wanted, broil sharply. Season to suit taste, covering with butter. This recipe will answer for all kinds of salt fish.


BROILED HALIBUT

Season the slices with salt and pepper, and lay them in melted butter for half an hour, having them well covered on both sides. Roll in flour, and broil for twelve minutes over a clear fire. Serve on a hot dish, garnishing with parsley and slices of lemon. The slices of halibut should be about an inch thick, and for every pound there should be three table-spoonfuls of butter.

Baked Candida Diet Fish Recipes

Good-sized fish, that is, fish weighing 4 or 5 pounds, are usually baked. When prepared by this method, fish are very satisfactory if they are spread out on a pan, flesh side up, and baked in a very hot oven with sufficient fat to flavor them well. A fish of large size, however, is especially delicious if its cavity is filled with a stuffing before it is baked.

When a fish is to be stuffed, any desired stuffing is prepared and then filled into the fish. With the cavity well filled, the edges of the fish are drawn together over the stuffing and sewed with a coarse needle and thread.

Whether the fish is stuffed or not, the same principles apply in its baking as apply in the roasting of meat; that is, the heat of a quick, hot oven sears the flesh, keeps in the juices, and prevents the loss of flavor, while that of a slow oven causes the loss of much of the flavor and moisture and produces a less tender dish. Often, in the baking of fish, it is necessary to add fat. This may be done by putting fat of some kind into the pan with the fish.

BAKED HADDOCK

As haddock is a good-sized fish, it is an especially suitable one for baking. However, it is a dry fish, so fat should be added to it to improve its flavor. When haddock is to be baked, select a 4 or 5-pound fish, clean it thoroughly, boning it if desired, and sprinkle it inside and out with salt. Fill the cavity with any desired stuffing and sew up. Place in a dripping pan, and add some fat or place several slices of high fat meat around it. Bake in a hot oven for about 1 hour. After it has been in the oven for about 15 minutes, baste with the fat that will be found in the bottom of the pan and continue to baste every 10 minutes until the fish is done. Remove from the pan to a platter, garnish with parsley and slices of meat, and serve with any desired sauce.

BAKED HALIBUT

Because of its size, halibut is cut into slices and sold in the form of steaks. Halibut slices are often sauted, but they make a delicious dish when baked with tomatoes and flavored with onion, lemon, and bay leaf.

2 c. tomatoes
Few slices onion
1 bay leaf
1 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper
2 thin slices bacon
1 Tb. flour
2 lb. halibut steak

Heat the tomatoes, onion, and bay leaf in water. Add the salt and pepper and cook for a few minutes. Cut the bacon into small squares, try it out in a pan, and into this fat stir the flour. Pour this into the hot mixture, remove the bay leaf, and cook until the mixture thickens. Put the steaks into a baking dish, pour the sauce over them, and bake in a slow oven for about 45 minutes. Remove with the sauce to a hot platter and serve.


BAKED SALMON TROUT

This deliciously flavored game-fish is baked precisely as shad or white fish, but should be accompanied with cream gravy to make it perfect. It should be baked slowly, basting often with butter and water. When done have ready in a saucepan a cup of cream, diluted with a few spoonfuls of hot water, for fear it might clot in heating, in which have been stirred cautiously two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a scant tablespoonful of flour, and a little chopped parsley. Heat this in a vessel set within another of boiling water, add the gravy from the dripping-pan, boil up once to thicken, and when the trout is laid on a suitable hot dish, pour this sauce around it. Garnish with sprigs of parsley.


BAKED SALMON WHOLE

Having cleaned a small or moderate sized salmon, season it with salt, pepper, and powdered mace rubbed on it both outside and in. Skewer it with the tail turned round and put to the mouth. Lay it on a stand or trivet in a deep dish or pan, and stick it over with bits of butter rolled in flour. Put it into the oven, and baste it occasionally, while baking, with its own drippings. Garnish it with horseradish and sprigs of curled parsley, laid alternately round the edge of the dish; and send to table with it a small tureen of lobster sauce.


BAKED BLUEFISH

Take 2 lb Bluefish fillets, 1/2 c. Milk, 1 c. Bread crumbs, 1/4 lb Butter, 2 tb Lemon juice, 1/2 c Seafood seasoning, Salt and pepper to taste. Preheat the oven to 450°. Dip fish in milk; sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. Coat fish with the bread crumbs. Place 1/2 table-spoon butter on each fillet; sprinkle with lemon juice and fish seasoning. Place fish in well buttered baking pan. Bake for ten to fifteen minutes.


BAKED FILLETS OF WHITEFISH

When whitefish of medium size can be secured, it is very often stuffed and baked whole, but variety can be had by cutting it into fillets before baking it. Besides producing a delicious dish, this method of preparation eliminates carving at the table, for the pieces can be cut the desired size for serving.

Prepare fillets of whitefish according to the directions given for filleting fish. Sprinkle each one with salt and pepper, and dip it first into beaten egg and then into bread crumbs. Brown some butter in a pan, place the fish into it, and set the pan in a hot oven. Bake until the fillets are a light brown, or about 30 minutes. Remove to a hot dish, garnish with parsley and serve with any desired sauce.


BAKED FINNAN HADDIE

When haddock is cured by smoking, it is known as 'finnan haddie'. As fish of this kind has considerable thick flesh, it is very good for baking. Other methods of cookery may, of course, be applied to it, but none is more satisfactory than baking. To bake a finnan haddie, wash it in warm water and put it to soak in fresh warm water. After it has soaked for 1/2 hour, allow it to come gradually to nearly the boiling point and then pour off the water. Place the fish in a baking pan, add a piece of butter, sprinkle with pepper, and pour a little water over it. Bake in a hot oven until it is nicely browned. Serve hot.


BAKED ROCK FISH

Rub the fish with salt, black pepper, and a dust of cayenne, inside and out; prepare a stuffing of bread and butter, seasoned with pepper, salt, parsley and thyme; mix an egg in it, fill the fish with this, and sew it up or tie a string round it; put it in a deep pan, or oval oven and bake it as you would a fowl. To a large fish add half a pint of water; you can add more for the gravy if necessary; dust flour over and baste it with butter. Any other fresh fish can be baked in the same way. A large one will bake slowly in an hour and a half, small ones in half an hour.

I hope you enjoy these baked fish recipes for the candida yeast diet.

Stewed Candida Diet Fish Recipes

Like boiling, stewing extracts flavor and nutriment from fish. The process differs, however, in that the fish is cooked gently by simmering. This cookery method is employed for fish that is inclined to be tough. Usually, vegetables, such as carrots and onions, are cooked with the fish in order to impart flavor. To prevent the fish from falling apart, it may be wrapped in cheesecloth or gauze.


STEWED FISH -1

Six pounds of any kind of fish, large or small; three large pints of water, quarter of a pound of pork, or, half a cupful of butter; two large onions, three table-spoonfuls of flour, salt and pepper to taste. Cut the heads from the fish, and cut out all the bones. Put the heads and bones on to boil in the three pints of water. Cook gently half an hour. In the meanwhile cut the pork in slices, and fry brown. Cut the onions in slices, and fry in the pork fat. Stir the dry flour into the onion and fat, and cook three minutes, stirring all the time. Now pour over this the water in which the bones have been cooking, and simmer ten minutes. Have the fish cut in pieces about three inches square. Season well with salt and pepper, and place in the stew-pan. Season the sauce with salt and pepper, and strain on the fish. Cover tight, and simmer twenty minutes.

A bouquet of sweet herbs, simmered with the bones, is an improvement. Taste to see if the sauce is seasoned enough, and dish on a large platter. Garnish with potato balls and parsley. The potato balls are cut from the raw potatoes with a vegetable scoop, and boiled ten minutes in salted water. Put them in little heaps around the dish.


STEWED FRESH HERRING

When fresh herring can be obtained, it can be made into a delicious dish by stewing it with onions, parsley, and carrots. In this method of preparation, the herring should not be
permitted to stew rapidly; it will become more tender if it simmers gently. As herring are rather small fish, weighing only about 1/2 pound, it will usually be necessary to obtain more than one for a meal.


Clean the required number of fresh herring, place them in a saucepan, and sprinkle them with salt and pepper. Brown some slices of onion in butter, and add the same number of slices of carrots and a generous quantity of parsley. Add enough boiling water to these vegetables to cover them and the fish, and pour both over the fish. Place all on the fire and simmer gently until the fish is tender. Remove the fish from the water and serve. The vegetables are used merely to add flavor, and they will have practically boiled away by the time the fish is cooked.


STEWED EELS -1

Eel is delicious when stewed. When allowed to simmer slowly with several slices of onion and a little parsley, it becomes both tasty and tender.  Skin and clean the eel that is to be stewed, remove all the fat, and cut into pieces about 2 inches long. Season well with salt and pepper and place in a saucepan with several slices of onion, 1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley, and 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. Add enough cold water to cover well, and allow the eel to simmer gently until it is tender enough to be pierced with a fork. Remove from the water and serve hot.


STEWED EELS -2

Cut two eels in pieces about four inches long. Put three large table-spoonfuls of butter into the stew-pan with half a small onion. As soon as the onion begins to turn yellow stir in two table-spoonfuls of flour, and stir until brown. Add one pint of stock, if you have it; if not, use water. Season well with pepper and salt; then put in the eels and two bay leaves. Cover, and simmer gently three-quarters of an hour. Heap the eels in the centre of a hot dish, strain the sauce over them and garnish with toasted bread and parsley. If you wish, add a table-spoonful of vinegar or lemon juice to the stew.


STEAMED FISH

The preparation of fish by steaming is practically the same as that by boiling, and produces a dish similar to boiled fish. The only difference is that steamed fish is suspended over the water and is cooked by the steam that rises instead of being cooked directly in the water. Because the fish is not surrounded by water, it does not lose its nutriment and flavor so readily as does boiled fish.

If fish is to be cooked by steaming, first clean it thoroughly. Wrap in a strip of gauze or cheesecloth and place in a steamer. Steam until tender, and then remove the cloth and place the fish on a platter. As steaming does not add flavor, it is usually necessary to supply flavor to fish cooked in this way by adding a sauce of some kind to this candida diet recipe.

A Few Shrimp, Prawn, and Shellfish Candida Diet Fish Recipes


Shrimp are similar to crabs and lobsters in composition and in the methods of preparation. They differ considerably in appearance, however, and are smaller in size. When alive, shrimp are a mottled greenish color, but upon being dropped into boiling-hot water they turn red. When they have cooked sufficiently, the meat, which is very delicious, may be easily removed from the shells. After the meat of shrimp is thus prepared, it may be used cold in a salad or a cocktail or it may be utilized in a number of ways for hot dishes. Very often a chafing dish is used in the preparation of such dishes, but this utensil is not necessary, as they may be cooked in an ordinary utensil on a stove of any kind.


SHRIMP A LA SALLE

Shrimp also makes an appetizing and attractive dish when combined with tomato and green pepper. The accompanying recipe gives directions for the preparation of such a dish, which is called
shrimp a La Salle.

2 Tb. butter
1 c. shredded shrimp
1 c. stewed tomato
1 small green pepper, chopped
1 Tb. chopped onion
1 tsp. celery salt
1 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper

Brown the butter in a saucepan and add the shrimp, tomato, green pepper, onion, celery salt, salt, and pepper. Heat all together thoroughly, and serve over toast.


Shrimp of course can always be eaten raw in salads with olive oil and lemon dressing.


DRAWN-BUTTER SAUCE

1/4 c. butter
2 Tb. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper
1-1/2 c. hot water
2 hard-cooked eggs

Melt the butter, and add the flour, salt, and pepper. Pour into this the hot water, and cook until the mixture thickens. Slice the eggs into 1/4-inch slices and add these to the sauce just before removing from the stove.


CRAWFISH STEW

This most popular crawfish is easy to prepare. Take 2 lbs. of cleaned crawfish tails, 1/4 cup tomato sauce, 1 cup olive oil, 3 qts. crawfish stock or water, 1 cup flour, 1 cup chopped green onions, 2 cups chopped onions, 1 cup chopped parsley, 1 cup chopped celery Salt and cayenne pepper to taste, 1 cup chopped bell pepper Dash of Louisiana Gold Pepper Sauce and 2 tbsp. diced garlic.

Any shellfish stock or fish stock may be substituted, but the dish will be good even if plain water is used. In a two gallon stock pot, heat oil over medium high heat. Add flour and using a wire whip, stir constantly until dark brown roux is achieved. When brown, add onions, celery, bell pepper and garlic and saute until vegetables are wilted, approximately three to five minutes. Add crawfish tails and cook until meat is pink and slightly curled. Stir in tomato sauce and slowly add crawfish stock stirring constantly until all is incorporated. Bring to a low boil, reduce to simmer and cook thirty minutes, stirring occasionally. Add green onions and parsley and season to taste using salt and pepper.

Djerba-Style Grilled Prawns

Yield: 4 Servings

16 whole green prawns backs
-split open,& deveined
2 t harissa paste
4 T extra virgin olive oil
1 T lemon juice

TOMATO RELISH ==================

2 lg ripe tomatoes, diced
1 c shallotts, diced
1 lg spanish onion,diced
2 t coriander, chopped
1 t cumin, ground
1 T garlic, chopped
2 T capers, chopped
2 T lemon juice
2 T light olive oil
1 pinch of sugar

Combine harissa paste, olive oil, and lemon juice and baste the cut flesh of the prawns. To make the relish, combine ingredients in bowl toss lightly. Leave for 20 mins. Grill or broil prawns and serve with tomato relish.

Foiled Fish On The Grill

Yield: 4 Servings

1 lb fish fillets
2 T butter

1/4 c lemon juice
1 T fresh parsley --, chopped
1 t fresh dill weed
1 t salt
1/4 t black pepper
1/4 t paprika
1 onion -- thinly,Sliced

Use heavy aluminum foil cut into large squares. Place equal portions of the fish fillets on each piece of foil. In a saucepan, melt margarine. Add lemon juice, parsley, dill, salt and pepper. Stir to blend well. Pour this mixture over the fish, sprinkle with paprika, and top with the onion slices which have been separated into rings. Fold the foil around the mixture and seal using a drugstore fold or other method of sealing tightly. Leave a little space for thefood to expand while cooking. Place on hot grill and grill for 5-7 minutes per side. Fish should flake easily when done.

Foiled Fish On The Grill Recipe

Yield: 4 Servings

1 lb fish fillets
2 T butter
1/4 c lemon juice
1 T fresh parsley --,chopped
1 t fresh dill weed
1 t salt
1/4 t black pepper
1/4 t paprika
1 onion -- thinly, Sliced

Use heavy aluminum foil cut into large squares. Place equal portions of the fish fillets on each piece of foil. In a saucepan, melt margarine. Add lemon juice, parsley, dill, salt and pepper. Stir to blend well. Pour this mixture over the fish, sprinkle with paprika, and top with the onion slices which have been separated into rings. Fold the foil around the mixture and seal using a drugstore fold or other method of sealing tightly. Leave a little space for thefood to expand while cooking. Place on hot grill and grill for 5-7 minutes per side. Fish should flake easily when done.

Glazed Grilled Trout

Yield: 6 Servings

6 trout (8 to 10 oz. each) - dressed
1/2 c teriyaki baste & glaze -(kikkoman)
4 t fresh lime juice
1 T finely dill weed -, Chopped -(fresh)
1 non-stick cooking spray
3 limes, cut into wedges

Score both sides of trout with 1/4-inch deep diagonal slashes 1 inch apart. Combine next 3 ingredients; brush trout, including cavities, thoroughly with mixture. Let stand 30 minutes. Coat grill rack with cooking spray; place 4 to 5 inches from medium-hot coals. Cook trout on rack 5 minutes on each side, or until fish flakes easily with fork. Brush occasionally with baste glaze mixture; serve with lime wedges. (Or, broil trout on rack of broiler pan 5 minutes on each side, brushing occasionally with baste glaze mixture.)

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